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1914 Trio to Captain A H Broad, 6th Liverpool Regt, WIA

Price £775

1914 Trio to Captain A H Broad, 6th Liverpool Regt, WIA

Great War 1914 Trio awarded to Captain Alfred Horace Broad, 6th (Rifle) Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment, late 10th (Liverpool Scottish) Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment, wounded in action at Wailly, comprising: 1914 Star & ‘Mons’ Clasp (2857 Pte A. H. Broad, 10/ L’Pool R.); British War and Victory Medals (Capt. A. H. Broad.); group loose, with original ribbons included separately. Lightly toned, extremely fine. Ex Hal Giblin ‘Liverpool Regiment’ Collection, DNW, 6th July 2004, lot 353. Alfred Horace Broad was born on the 1st of December, 1893 at No. 3 Coltart Road, Liverpool. At the outbreak of the Great War, Alfred Broad was living with his family at 18 Jermyn Street, Princes Park, Liverpool, and he had been educated at the Liverpool Institute, where he had also been a member of the OTC, leaving in December 1910. He initially enlisted as a Private in the 10th Battalion King’s Liverpool Regiment; more famously known as the Liverpool Scottish, on the 16th of March, 1914 – he had previously been working as a Clerk with the London City and Midland Bank Ltd. He left for service in France aboard the S.S. Maidan in Novemeber 1914. He received his commission into the 1st/6th Battalion KLR on the 5th of August, 1915 as a 2nd Lieutenant, and he was wounded in action at Wailly on the 12th of July, 1916, receiving a rifle bullet wound to the right forearm. He was admitted to the 1st/3rd West Lancashire Field Ambulance, and was eventually evacuated to the UK on the H. S. Asturias, to be admitted to the 2nd Western General Hospital in Manchester. Despite suffering a slow recovery, being struck with influenza and debility from his wound, he was permitted to return to the front in early 1918, only to never fully recover from his original wound. Being returned to Folkestone, his doctor wrote: “I have carefully examined the above officer and find him in a weak and debilitated condition. He is sleeping badly and tires very easily. Extension of leave is recommended for three weeks. He also has a small septic wound of the right wrist.” Disembodied on the 20th of February, 1919, and was allowed to retain his rank of Captain. His address at discharge was No. 18 Jermyn Street, Liverpool. He had married Constance S Armistead at St. Bedes, Toxteth Park in 1917. Genealogical research suggests that he died at the age of 51, in St. Helens, Lancashire. Sold with copy MIC, and some useful research.