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For all press or media enquiries please contact Richard West rwest@baldwin.co.uk or on +44 (0)20 7557 4489.

The study of Roman coinage involves several academic disciplines, namely: Ancient History, Economic History, Archaeology and Numismatics. The answer to why these disciplines vary in approach to what is ultimately one of the most familiar artefacts in our daily lives, is down to the origin of the studies of coins themselves and the various influences of archaeology and economics as our understanding of sociology and anthropology has developed.

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0 Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog By Razia Sultana

COMMODUS’ BRITANNIA

5 July 2018

Britannia is a symbol of British success and power. I’m sure everyone reading this magazine will be all too familiar with her depictions on more recent British coins.  But Britannia didn’t always rule the waves.  She was an all too Roman invention.  

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0 Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog By Razia Sultana

This Sovereign was minted in the second half of Henry’s relatively lengthy reign. In 1526 the value of English gold coins was increased by 10% in order to stop the flow of gold into Europe, and therefore the Sovereign assumed a new value of 22 shillings.

Henry VII sovereign

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0 Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog By Claudia Cadete

Coins first appeared in Ionia around 650 BC. They subsequently spread to mainland Greece and continued across Europe from there. Roman coins come later, and cover over seven centuries of rule and power. Much later, European countries adopted their own coinage. History like this has resulted in a near infinite variety of coins for you to collect, for either aesthetic reasons or investment purposes. A good idea is to pick a theme or themes around which to base your purchases.

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0 Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog By Razia Sultana

A GUIDE TO COIN COLLECTING

21 February 2018

Coins are classic collectable items. The opportunity to own a piece of history used by people of times gone by has established coin collecting as a popular hobby enjoyed by individuals of all ages. Using coins as a medium of investment is also becoming more widespread.

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0 Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog By Razia Sultana

Dealers:

A.H. Baldwin & Sons Ltd, 399 Strand London WC2R 0LX

MARK SMITH - MEDALLIST

 

How did you get started?

On Friday afternoons I used to be taken from school to see one of my two Grandma’s, my Father’s Mother.  She lived in a very Victorian house which had a parlour, dark cold and spotlessly clean; in the sideboard was a wooden box in which were my Father’s medals from World War Two, he was a Wireless Operator Air Gunner with 240 Squadron R.A.F. with Coastal Command and then in the Far East with the Special Duties Flight of 240, where he and his crew delivered Force 136 S.O.E. and O.S.S. agents in to the Japanese-held islands.  My bedtime stories, when small, were taken directly from his RAF Log Book and he would tell me the story of one “Op” from briefing to the target and back, I never got much sleep but the stories were fascinating.  One Friday afternoon in June 1969 on my visit to Nan, my Grandma gave me the box with the medals in; I went home made a display, got a book from the Library and was totally hooked on medals and the stories.  More family medals, cap badges, steel helmets, bayonets and trench art started to turn up as Aunts and Uncles at last found a home for all this military junk they had brought home from various wars; World War Two, World War One and the Boer War were well covered stretching back to my Great Great Great Grandfather, Private Henry Dickerson, who joined the Rifle Brigade in 1854.

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0 Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog By Razia Sultana

Agathokles’ gold 100 Litra coins usually feature a portrait of Athena and a thunderbolt. Struck c. 304-289 BC, Syracuse. The island of Sicily has an unusual past.  During the classical period the small island off the coast of Italy was home to a variety of small city states, originally Greek colonies – the largest of which was Syracuse.  Syracuse, unlike many traditional Greek cities, had a tormented political history.  From the 5th Century BC until the Roman period, it was ruled both a tyranny and a democracy – sometimes both – countless times in its history. One tyrant, however, has become more infamous than any other.

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0 Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog By Razia Sultana

The Romans hated kings.  Since XXX BC Rome had been ruled as a Republic, and as a Republic, had risen to become the dominant power in Western Europe.  Hannibal was defeated.  Greece was occupied, and Celtic Gaul was being subdued thanks to a popular general by the name of Gaius Julius Caesar.  The Senate controlled Rome.  A select group of high-ranking citizens controlled the armies and almost all elements of Roman society.

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0 Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog By Razia Sultana

Constantine’s reign was a turning point in the history of the Roman Empire.  He introduced economic and social reforms which would see the end of a century of crisis in the Roman world, but most importantly he allowed for a religion which had been shunned by Roman Society for three decades to come into the light. 

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0 Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog By Razia Sultana

Baldwin’s joint venture with Baldwin’s of St. James’s has resulted in a most successful outcome with their Coinex auctions achieving almost £3 million coming from the sale of one of Britain’s most beautiful and iconic coins setting a new World record

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Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog Press Releases By Razia Sultana

A Brief History of the Gold Sovereign

There are many sources for the history of the gold Sovereign some of which are given in the Bibliography but one of the more recent, succinct and accurate is that which this cataloguer would recommend in the Royal Mint publication “The Gold Sovereign 1489-1989” essay The Fifteenth Century Revival” by John Pourteous, published 1989.

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Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog By Claudia Cadete

Commodus is probably best known for his appearance in the 2000 film, Gladiator.  Though quite inaccurate, the film may actually have captured his wild, cruel side quite well.  Commodus has received mixed reviews in history.  He is seen as a mad emperor who indulged in the excitement of the Roman games.  Popular with the masses, but hated by the Senate. The polar opposite of his father, the great Marcus Aurelius, Commodus is known to have appeared in the Colosseum, but rather than just spectating, he would actually get involved in the melee – though he would always win any fight.

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0 Comments | Posted in The Baldwin's Blog By Razia Sultana

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